Archives

TRANSLATE WEBSITE

Next Fall – Port City Playhouse

Jordan Wright
March 3, 2014
Special to The Alexandria Times

Adam is played by Richard Isaacs, Luke by Fred Dechow - Photo credit Michael deBlois.

Adam is played by Richard Isaacs, Luke by Fred Dechow – Photo credit Michael deBlois.

When Luke (Frederick Dechow) and Adam (Richard Isaacs) meet at a rooftop party in New York City they click, despite their disparities.  Luke is a young aspiring actor and “cater waiter”, and Adam once an aspiring writer wallows in a mid-life crisis at a dead end job at his friend Holly’s candle shop.  Though they have opposing views, Luke prays after sex and Adam is a dyed-in-the-wool atheist, they move in together.  And though Adam feels as though all the end-of-the-world stuff and the who’s-going-to-heaven and who’s-going-to-hell routine is “a bit Vegas”, when Luke has a life-threatening accident Adam must take into account Luke’s religious philosophy.

Geoffrey Nauffts’ comic drama Next Fall, first brought to Broadway in 2010 by Producers Elton John and David Furnish, examines the opposing forces of conflict and sacrifice within a relationship in a script filled with wry wit, a steady stream of funny lines and deadpan sarcasm.

Brandon by Andy De, Arlene by Gayle N. Grimes and Holly by Suzanne Martin - Photo credit to Michael deBlois

Brandon by Andy De, Arlene by Gayle N. Grimes and Holly by Suzanne Martin – Photo credit to Michael deBlois.

The play opens in a waiting room at New York’s Beth Israel Medical Center where   Brandon (Andy De), Holly (Suzanne Martin), Arlene (Gayle Nichols-Grimes), Butch (Cal Whitehurst) and Adam await news of Luke’s condition.  Adam has to figure out how to deal with Arlene and Butch, Luke’s homophobic parents who don’t know their son is gay.  For the rest of the play the action shifts back and forth from the men’s Bleeker Street apartment, where the men’s relationship begins to strengthen despite their differences, to the hospital where Adam must hide their love from Luke’s parents.

In a clever technique Director Rob Batarla transitions the thirteen scene changes from hospital to apartment and back with music of the period and projections of grainy black and white photographs of the men throughout their five-year relationship.

Adam is played by Richard Isaacs, Luke by Fred Dechow, Butch by Cal Whitehurst - Photo credit to Michael deBlois

Adam is played by Richard Isaacs, Luke by Fred Dechow, Butch by Cal Whitehurst – Photo credit to Michael deBlois

There are awkward exchanges between Arlene and Adam as when she surprises him by confessing her fears and a not very pristine past while Adam struggles to comprehend Brandon, Luke’s former boyfriend, who practices gay sex yet doesn’t believe in a gay relationship.  Notwithstanding the proclivity of the three gay characters, the play addresses familiar themes of faith, commitment and love.

The cast in this provocative production is in synch throughout.  Dechow plays Luke with subtlety and restraint, Isaacs gives Adam an endearingly derisive quality using a vast repertoire of facial expressions, and Martin imbues Holly with charm and verve.  Whitehurst and Nichols-Grimes, both well known in the local theatre community, craft characters that reveal depth as well as empathy.

At Port City Playhouse at The Lab at Convergence, 1819 North Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA 22302.  Remaining performances are on the following dates – February 28, March 1, 7, 8, 11, 14, & 15 at 8pm.  Matinees on March 8 & 15 at 2pm.  For tickets and information visit www.portcityplayhouse.org.

Post to Twitter

The Ballad of the Red Knight – By Red Knight Productions at Port City Playhouse

Jordan Wright
January 30, 2014
Special to The Alexandria Times

Red Knight & Fanglett

Red Knight & Fanglett

As I took my seat on press night I overheard that The Ballad of the Red Knight producers had recommended parents bring along their children.  It explained why all four little ones behind me were chattering like monkeys and wriggling in their seats before the first line was uttered.  “I don’t want to be here,” one of them said.  “You’re gonna love it,” a patient parent assured.  And from the moment the knights-in-tights burst out onto the stage they all fell as silent as tiny mice, except of course for the communal roars of laughter.

It seemed writer Scott Courlander had gotten exactly the reaction he’d expected.  His “Director’s Note” urges the audience to, “Think of this as a Saturday morning cartoon come to life….as in Rin Tin Tin, The Lone Ranger…or Ninja Turtles.”.  Though I can’t for the life of me explain his reference to the famed German Shepherd, we were certainly a rapt audience for Courlander’s crazy fable that seems more like Monty Python and the Holy Grail meets The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show’sFractured Fairy Tales” than canine TV. 

Gloom Mage

Gloom Mage

If you’ve a predilection for wizards and heroes, sword fights and a princess who happens to be a bat, you’re going to love this, but first you’ll need to disabuse yourself of any Arthurian preconceptions.  In a tale that caters to the funny bone – where knights sport Lurex and carry logoed lunchboxes, the Red Knight (Christopher Herring) is the hero crusader.  His mode of conquering his kingdom’s foes is to shower them with absurd compliments until they surrender to his charms.   He and his brother Prince Richard (Kyle McGruther) must seek revenge on Lord Fango (Charles Boyington) and his vampire Bat People for the murder of their father, King Marthur.   But the nefarious Lord Fango has dire plans of his own and captures the bumbling Prince Richard, tossing him into the dungeon and forcing the Red Knight to go on a quest with the aid of The Gloom Mage (John Stange) an untrustworthy sorcerer while Fango tries to marry off his pretty but blood-sucking daughter Fanglett (Katie Zitz) to the Red Knight in order to produce an heir.  Got it?  Bring on the Fertility Mages!

Three hapless Bat Guards in thrall to Fango and a trio of colorful knights – Yellow, Green and Blue – faithful to the brothers, keep the swords clacking throughout.  Boyington plays Fango to the hilt with a performance, and a physical appearance,  reminiscent of Austin Powers’ Dr. Evil and Flash Gordon’s Ming the Merciless.   Fanglett, the only female in the production, sums it up nicely.  “It was suggested that the playwright struggled with writing fully developed female characters.”

Lord Fango & Bat Guard

Lord Fango & Bat Guard

The madcap adventure features a Narrator, an adorably silly court jester, played captivatingly by Stephen Mead, who in Richard’s words, “does this stupid bit where he says what everyone is doing”.  This device is of particular assistance to the audience in order to keep the mayhem sorted out for those of us who are reeling from the sorcery, wizardry, teleportation and passel of knights in this over-the-top comedy top-loaded with a constant stream of puns (“good cop, bat cop”) and double entendres.

I’d advise suspending logic – a suggestion that comes too late for one of the tykes behind me who remarked, “But, Daddy, you can’t turn a man into a bowl!”

Fun for children and grownups who still are.

At Port City Playhouse at The Lab at Convergence, 1819 North Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA 22302.  Remaining performances are on the following dates – February 1, 7, 8, at 8:00 p.m.  Matinees on February 1 & 8 at 2pm.  For tickets and information visit www.portcityplayhouse.org.

Post to Twitter

Shiloh Rules – A Big Hit for Port City Playhouse

Jordan Wright
November 11, 2013
Special to The Alexandria Times
 

Nyla Rose DeGroat (Ranger Wilson) & Shaina Higgins  (Lucy Gale) - photo credit  Michael deBlois.

Nyla Rose DeGroat (Ranger Wilson) & Shaina Higgins (Lucy Gale) – photo credit Michael deBlois.

Have you ever been curious about what goes on behind the scenes at battle reenactments?  A type of “living history” that focuses on a singular moment in a particular battle and requires the participants to live outdoors, dress in hand-stitched period clothing, carry authentic arms, foodstuffs and field medicines, and speak in the manner of the day, it has become a popular pastime.  In Shiloh Rules playwright Doris Baizly provides us not only with an intriguing behind-the-scenes interpretation of the type of people that participate in these activities, but also an exciting multi-layered script.  As her character, veteran re-enactor Clara May Abbott (Jean Hudson Miller), puts it, “We play by Shiloh rules.  There aren’t any.”

Factoid: Though there are more Civil War battlefields in Virginia than anywhere else in the country, the bloodiest of all the battles was the Battle of Shiloh in East Tennessee where 23,000 casualties were sustained.  The hallowed land is now called the Shiloh Battlefield Park where the action takes place.

Karen Lawrence (Cecilia) & Shaina Higgins (LucyGale) - photo credit Michael deBlois

Karen Lawrence (Cecilia) & Shaina Higgins (LucyGale) – photo credit Michael deBlois

Director Mary Ayala-Bush has chosen to present the play in the round, a decision that creates a super-charged energy level.  Drama and comedy converge when six women meet on the battlefield.  Clara May, known as the “Angel of Antietam”, is on the Union side with young Meg (Jennifer McClean), a nursing school student.  On the rebel front are Cecelia Delaunay Pettison (Karen V. Lawrence), the embodiment of the iron-fist-in-the-velvet-glove Southern woman, and Lucygale Scruggs (Shaina Higgins), a gung-ho first timer with a taste for blood in her youthful heart.  Each describes a wartime profile of their character.

The rules of the re-enactors are created and overseen by the feisty Widow Beckwith (Adriana Hardy), the head of the “Authenticity Committee”, whose penchant for breaking the very rules she invents is outweighed only by her skewed sense of what is authentic.  But Beckwith is outranked by Park Ranger Wilson (Nyla Rose DeGroat), a martinet whose adherence to the park’s rules threatens to upset the ladies’ adventures.  Nonetheless it is Wilson, an African-American, puzzled by the women’s zeal to open up the old racist wounds of war, who raises the question, “Why keep fighting it?”

Adriana Hardy (Widow Beckwith) & Nyla Rose DeGroat (Ranger Wilson) - photo credit  Michael deBlois

Adriana Hardy (Widow Beckwith) & Nyla Rose DeGroat (Ranger
Wilson) – photo credit Michael deBlois

When the battle begins before dawn before the bugler’s signal, all hell breaks loose.  The rebels won’t “fall down”, real weapons are drawn and the action becomes all too real.

Ayala-Bush, who is also the Set Designer evokes the encampment with simple canvas tents on either side of the set – – one for the ladies of the North the other for the South.

left to right, Jennifer McClean, Adriana Hardy, Shaina Higgins, Jean Hudson Miller, Nyla Rose DeGroat & Karen Lawrence - photo credit Michael deBlois

left to right, Jennifer McClean, Adriana Hardy, Shaina Higgins, Jean Hudson Miller, Nyla Rose DeGroat & Karen Lawrence – photo credit Michael deBlois

Kudos to the entire cast who are in perfect synch in this outstanding production.  Special recognition to Sound Designer Sean Doyle who does a “bang up” job recreating the fusillade of battle.

Highly recommended.

At Port City Playhouse at The Lab at Convergence, 1819 North Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA 22302.  Performances are on the following dates – Nov. 8, 19, 22, 23, 24, 27 & 28 at 8:00 p.m.  Matinees on Nov. 16 & 23 at 2pm.  For tickets and information visit www.portcityplayhouse.org.

Post to Twitter

The Children’s Hour At Port City Playhouse

Jordan Wright
September 15, 2013
Special to The Alexandria Times
 

When Lillian Hellman wrote The Children’s Hour in 1934, it was a very different time…or was it?  Hellman was an original, a maverick whose anti-fascist writings branded her a communist and who was later summoned to the House Un-American Activities Committee to inform on her fellow writers.  Her response to HUAC revealed an early feminist who would defend her rights and those of others.  In her writings Hellman concerned herself with social issues of the day, in this drama she points the spotlight on intolerance and fear mongering.

Katelyn Wattendorf (Mary), Ellie Milewski (Evelyn), Cynthia  >Mullins (Peggy) and Jenni Patton (Rosalie)  - photo credit to Michael deBlois

Katelyn Wattendorf (Mary), Ellie Milewski (Evelyn), Cynthia
>Mullins (Peggy) and Jenni Patton (Rosalie)
- photo credit to Michael deBlois

In Port City Playhouse’s latest production, a willful girl claims to have seen and/or heard, depending on her revisionist fantasies, a liaison between the two headmistresses at her posh boarding school.  The cast includes nine schoolgirls, a daft aunt, a wealthy grandmother and her housemaid, and a doctor, fiancé to one of the two headmistresses.  The play is based on factual events that occurred at a girl’s boarding school in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1809.

Mary Tilford is the original “Bad Seed”. “I’m always getting punished for everything,” she whines to her gullible grandmother in hopes of leaving school.  As she ratchets up her stories to make her case, “They’ll kill me.  They’ve got secrets…funny ones.” the old lady softens, believing her scandalous tale.  When she spreads the vicious lies to all the children’s parents, it brings about the destruction of the headmistresses’ reputations and that of their newly established school.

Carole Steele (Mrs. Tilford) & Katelyn Wattendorf (Mary) - photo credit to Michael deBlois.

Carole Steele (Mrs. Tilford) & Katelyn Wattendorf (Mary) – photo credit to Michael deBlois.

The story is gripping and, despite some uneven performances, is a fine play that you may remember was turned into a movie in 1961 starring Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine, with James Garner in the role of the doctor and cousin to Mrs. Tilford.

Katelyn Wattendorf is commanding as the evil-minded and manipulative Mary Tilford, a sociopathic bully who threatens and cajoles in equal measure.  Jenni Patton, who plays Mary’s tortured schoolmate, Rosalie Wells, provides the perfect counterbalance with a convincing performance as Mary’s handmaiden.  Michelle McBeth playing Karen Wright, headmistress and fiancée to Dr. Cardin, and Chelsey Megli as her cohort Martha Dobie give nuanced performances as the accused women.  Carole Steele in the role of the unduly moralistic Amelia Tilford contributes the right measure of grace and iron will to the supercilious nosy parker, while Robin Ann Carter, who was unsteady as the eccentric Mrs. Mortar, played it for laughs in flamboyant Auntie Mame style.  Unfortunately the slow pace in the second act threatened to derail the dramatic buildup.  Hopefully the kinks will be ironed out by next weekend’s performances.

Chesley Megli (Martha Dobie) & Michelle McBeth (Karen Wright) - photo credit to Michael deBlois

Chesley Megli (Martha Dobie) & Michelle McBeth (Karen Wright) – photo credit to Michael deBlois

A clever set design by Raedun de Alba serves as both living room and classroom at the school, and later, gussied up with lace and bric-a-brac, as Mrs. Tilford’s drawing room.  Scenes with the girls playing at Bonnie and Clyde and reading aloud scenes from Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra lend credence to Hellman’s reimagined setting at a girl’s school in Lancet, Massachusetts in 1934.  Costume designs by Kit Sibley and Jean Schlichting echo the prim school uniforms and dowager dresses and lace-up footwear of the day.

At Port City Playhouse at The Lab at Convergence, 1819 North Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA 22302.  Performances are on the following dates – Sept. 13, 14, 20, 21, 24, 27 & 28 at 8:00 p.m.  Matinees on Sept. 21 & 28 at 2pm.  For tickets and information visit www.portcityplayhouse.org.

Post to Twitter

Six Degrees of Separation At Port City Playhouse

Jordan Wright
April 22, 2013
Special to The Alexandria Times
 

Chaz Pando as Paul and Dana Gattuso as Ouisa Kittredge -  photo credit J. Andrew Simmons

Chaz Pando as Paul and Dana Gattuso as Ouisa Kittredge – photo credit J. Andrew Simmons

When John Guare’s now iconic play was first produced at the Lincoln Center in New York in 1993, it was a timely concept.  Society had been reconfigured over the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s by integration, intermarriage and the acceptance of celebrities mixing with high society – most especially in New York where music, theatre, fashion and the arts have always defined social constructs.  They called it “The Jet Set” for its mix of international luminaries and well-heeled travelers.  Recreational drugs had a way of bringing unlikely social enclaves together and gallery openings sent the uptown crowd downtown to Soho, the East Village and Tribecca to dip their naïve toes into the newly fashionable unknown.  In Six Degrees of Separation Guare visits the evolving complexities of Society vis-à-vis Modern Art at the turn of the decade.

Ouisa and Flan Kittredge are a well-heeled WASP couple who fancy themselves liberal-minded.  Flan, a self-styled art dealer, is on the hunt for two million dollars to buy a French masterpiece he intends to flip for a profit to the Japanese.  When his wealthy friend, Geoffrey, comes by for a drink they pitch him their idea.  Interested, Paul explains his political position as an owner of gold mines in South Africa.  “We have to educate the black workers.  We’ll know we’re successful when they kill us,” he haughtily states.  To which Ouisa replies, “It doesn’t seem right living on the East Side talking about revolution.”  Her husband, attempting to soften her stance, clarifies. “Ouisa is a Dada manifesto.”

Chuck Leonard as Flan  Kittredge (R) and Chaz Pando as Paul (L) - photo credit J. Andrew Simmons

Chuck Leonard as Flan Kittredge (R) and Chaz Pando as Paul (L) – photo credit J. Andrew Simmons

Thus the stage is set for an existential exercise in compassion, morals and old money when a well-dressed young African-American male knocks on their door, weak from a stabbing, and throws himself on their mercy.  He introduces himself as a schoolmate of their Harvard-attending children and just like that, Paul is in the door and in their thrall as they quiz him on literature, art and the “Black Experience”.  Paul readily expounds on his intellectual theories and tells them he is the son of famed actor, Sidney Poitier.  They agree to back a film festival in New York City if they can act in Poitier’s next film.  And as raconteur extraordinaire Paul boondoggles his victims, their involvement becomes compounded by their sympathies.  “We turned him into an anecdote to dine out on,” Ouisa admits.

Guare has managed to perfectly capture the mood of the period – White guilt, radicalism of art, sex and politics and the confusion, curiosity and fear that comes from such a dramatic social shift.  So successful is this play, based on a true story, that its title has become part of our shared lexicon, a euphemism for how closely we are socially connected.  It has even spawned a parlor game called the “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon” in which two actors can be connected through their films or their love life.

Kyle McGruther as Trent Conway (L) and Chaz Pando as Paul - photo credit J. Andrew Simmons

Kyle McGruther as Trent Conway (L) and Chaz Pando as Paul – photo credit J. Andrew Simmons

As Port City Playhouse celebrates its 100th show since its founding, they have chosen the perfect vehicle to launch them into what will be their 36th season.  Director Mary Ayala-Bush triumphs in the subtle staging of this production.  On a small stage in the round she has managed to choreograph the actors so as to draw in the audience and deliver a feeling of shared experience and believability.  Dana Gattuso (as Ouisa), Chuck Leonard (as Flan), Chaz Pando (as Paul), Marcus Anderson (as Rick) and Kyle McGruther (as Trent Conway, Paul’s Henry Higgins) are especially riveting, as is a cameo by Daniel McKay (as the gay hustler).

Highly recommended.

Port City Playhouse at The Lab at Convergence, 1819 North Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA 22302.  Performances are on the following dates – Apr. 19th, 20th, 26th, 30th and May 3rd and 4th at 8pm.  Matinees on Apr. 27 and May 4th at 2pm.  For tickets and information visit www.portcityplayhouse.org.

Post to Twitter